Beatyard is delighted to bring Chvrches to Dun Laoghaire, Dublin this August.

 

LOVE IS DEAD

If you love driving fast with the windows rolled down playing top 40 radio at full volume and you play in a band, you usually have one goal: get your songs out of your garage and into the worlds’ collective car speakers as soon as humanly possible. Lauren Mayberry, Iain Cook, and Martin Doherty certainly fit this bill. They unabashedly adore music of the wind-in-your-hair variety. And, of course, they play in a band, the Scottish synth pop group, CHVRCHES.

And yet … Since emerging in 2013 with the glistening brightness of their breakthrough single, “Recover,” CHVRCHES have always projected an insularity, a subtle but unmistakable wariness about leaning into their obvious Hit Song of the Summer-writing potential. At their core, CHVRCHES are true blue Glaswegian punks. They’ve wanted to protect themselves, and protect that undercurrent of melancholy that gives depth to their sunniness.

To this end, the band members have always kept their creative process close and tight. They’ve been diligent to the max about managing the way their band is portrayed. And, of course, they have historically produced every piece of music themselves, including their 2013 debut, The Bones of What You Believe, and 2015 follow-up, Every Open Eye. “Certainly not,” was their go-to response, Martin recalls laughing, when asked to consider collaboration. “We knew that if you get led down the wrong path it can completely derail your career.” But if there’s a theme in CHVRCHES’ world as they prepare to release their third record, Love Is Dead, it’s willful, determined openness, both ideologically – more on that in a minute – and in terms of actual creative process.

This time around, instead of Lauren disappearing for days at a time, the trio stayed in the same room even while Lauren was writing lyrics. As a result, the album “feels a lot more coherent,” she says. Lauren also consciously pulled from a different psychic well when writing those lyrics, one that’s less introspective and more expansive and imagistic. “I tried to write less about romantic love specifically,” she says. “And more about the overarching concept of love.” And, for the first time ever, CHVRCHES opened their proverbial doors to outside influence. The Eurythmics’ Dave Stewart served as the band’s de facto mentor, providing insight Lauren says “really pushed us to focus on the artistic integrity of the album and everything that surrounds it.” Steve Mac co-produced the soaring ode to hope, “Miracle.” And thanks to some extremely productive time spent in what Lauren calls his “Aladdin’s Cave,” Greg Kurstin (Adele, Sia) wound up co-producing eight of the record’s twelve tracks. “We had similar musical tastes and we clicked in the writing process pretty quickly,” Kurstin recalls. “I got to pull out all of the things I don’t have a chance to normally use.”

The result is the purest ever distillation of CHVRCHES’ signature pretty gloom. “It makes more sense than anything else we’ve made because it most accurately represents us,” says Martin. “We’ve always had this super difficult side to us – artistic and introspective and angry, but then we also fully embrace commercial music,” he continues. “When we talked about this album, before we even made it, we talked about it that way, we talked about there being two sides to the band. With Love Is Dead, we’ve broadened the appeal, but there are moments that are more difficult than anything we’ve ever done.”

This conscious move towards openness in the creative process reflects a bigger, deeper existential theme as well. “We live in a time where the death of empathy is pretty evident,” Lauren explains. “You turn on the news and see story after story about how selfish and unkind people are, but also stories of strength and resilience and resistance. How do we deal with both those things?” That question, of how to honor our justifiable despair about the state of the world, while moving towards hope and love, mirrors CHVRCHES’ sonic blend of dualities. As Lauren exhorts in “ii”, the instrumental / spoken word intro to album closer “Wonderland”:

Truth exists somewhere between the dark and the light

It’s that quest for balance that runs throughout Love Is Dead.

Lead single “Get Out” is a sprawling crescendo of heartbroken joy, and the album’s opening track, “Graffiti,” with it’s lilting syncopated backbeat follows suit. “Wrote our names along the bathroom walls, graffiti-ing our hearts across the stalls,” Lauren sings. “I’ve been waiting for my whole life to grow old and now we never will.” The song captures a sense of perspective on the passage of time. “Growing up and realizing things aren’t going to be the way you thought they would be,” the singer explains. “The feeling of Stand By Me, ‘I never had any friends later on like the ones I had when I was 12. Jesus, did you?’”

Then there’s the slinky “Deliverance,” which personifies that classic CHVRCHES blend of punk ethos with a pure pop sound. “You don’t hear people singing on the radio about the hypocrisy of religion,” says Iain, “but that’s what’s exciting about it. We were thinking about Like a Prayer era Madonna, and Nick Cave, and Depeche Mode’s Songs of Faith and Devotion.”

The band doesn’t consider their music expressly political, per se, but the urgent, brightly haunted “Graves,” with lyrics like “they’re leaving bodies in stairwells and washing up on the shore/you can look away while they’re dancing on our graves/if you don’t have a heart I can offer you mine,” feels abject and despairing yet joyful in a decidedly topical way. And on, “Miracle,” Mayberry questions “I feel like but I’m falling but I’m trying to fly, where does all the good go?”

Speaking of politics, the dreamy “Heaven/Hell,” with lyrics like, “Is it right if I’m a perfect actress/Playing the princess in distress?/Is it alright if I save myself and/If I clean up my own mess?/Is it enough yet, ‘cause I’ve had enough?” gets at an issue CHVRCHES have been dealing with since their very first Twitter follower: what it’s like to be a rock band with a female frontperson. From the jump, Lauren has been outspoken about the vitriolic sexism and misogyny she was expected to tolerate merely because she’s a female human being singing on a stage. Hers is a perspective that has found much greater support in this last year, which is great, obviously. “I think it’s healthy that it’s in the mainstream,” Martin says, “of course, but she was getting fucking slaughtered five years ago, for saying stuff that’s now everywhere I look. Lauren stood up against this kind of behavior on day one.”

And she paid a price. Unlike her bandmates, who, by the time CHVRCHES formed, had already logged a lot of years in other groups, Lauren’s entrée to the rock and roll life was more trial by fire. “I was 23 when I met Iain, 24 when we started this band and I’m thirty now,” she recalls. “I’ve had to grow up in front of people.” From the very beginning, “there was a lot of trepidation on my part,” she recalls. “As a woman in any industry but especially as a woman in the entertainment industry, I knew how people talk about you. How they perceive you. Even before the first record came out I could see all these monsters in the trees already. Some of those monsters turned out to be real. Some of them did not.”

That’s a lot of what Love Is Dead is about: growing up, “coming to terms with the fact that there are great things in the world and there are awful things in the world and that you can’t get one without the other,” Lauren says. It’s that duality, again. “We’re fucked, the world is fucked,” Iain summarizes, with a smile. “But there’s an ellipses at the end. It’s Love Is Dead…. Like, how did we get to this point? And how do we move on from this point? It’s Love Is Dead, we’re fucked, what’s next?”

Beatyard is delighted to bring Jungle to Dun Laoghaire, Dublin this August.

Funk-indebted acts characterized by lazing rhythms, falsetto vocals, and commercial aspirations were scarce in 2014, when Jungle capitalized upon their breakthrough single “Busy Earnin'” with a self-titled album that hit the U.K. Top Ten. By the time the band had been nominated for a Mercury Prize and released the first singles from their follow-up full-length, the novelty tag had worn off and they had become fixtures of the revered XL Recordings label.


Led by childhood friends Josh Lloyd-Watson and Tom McFarland, musicians originally identified as J and T, Jungle formed in early 2013 and wasted little time. Connected with the Chess Club label, they released their first singles – the hypnotic and relaxed dance grooves “Platoon” and “The Heat” — that July and October.

Jungle expanded to a seven-piece band for live performances, as Lloyd-Watson and McFarland did not want to simply play the music from their laptops in concert. In early 2018, they released the drifting “House in L.A.” and grooving “Happy Man” as the first singles off their second album, For Ever. Several other singles followed in advance of the album, which was released in September of that year.

Beatyard is delighted to bring Marc Rebillet to Dun Laoghaire, Dublin this August.

Marc Rebillet, an artist, actor, musician, composer, humorist, philosopher and phone psychotherapist who explores the realms of the looping art.

Marc was spiritually born around 2007 in an iPhone waiting line. Hearing a voice in the bathroom calling him on a mission, he went there and found fortune. He then launched his big plan for ruling the world, based on pooping on everything. He failed, but his aspirations remain intact.
Taking advantage of the huge popularity he immediately reached on YouTube (14 subscribers in less than a day), he bought a BOSS RC-505 loop station. To cook rice? No, asshole, to make loops. Some may ask: “Why looping?” and Marc would probably answer: “I don’t know man, I just do what I like”. But don’t be fooled, we all know the reason is that he’s just a lazy dumbass.
Despite what you might expect, he learned to play the piano at 5. Immediately noticed by his teachers, he became the boy we all know as the “Mozart of Dallas” in no time, composing his best masterpieces before reaching age 12. He then fell sick, ravaged by an inexplicable melancholy.
Desperate, his parents tried everything to cure him. From therapists to beating the shit out of him, including his uncle Jimmy trying to help with “special bedroom sessions”, nothing seemed to lead to recovery. He got worse.

Beatyard is delighted to bring The Congos to Dun Laoghaire, Dublin this August.

Reggae heroes, The Congos, hail from Jamaica and formed in the mid 70s as the duo “Ashanti” Roy Johnson (tenor) (b. Roydel Johnson, 1947, Hanover, Jamaica) and Cedric Myton (falsetto) (b. 1947, Saint Catherine Parish, Jamaica), later becoming a trio with the addition of Watty Burnett (baritone) (b.early 1950s, Port AntonioJamaica). They are best known for their Heart of the Congos album, recorded with Lee “Scratch” Perry.

 

Hometown hero joins us on the Wigwam stage to bring his unique blend of Italo Disco goodness.

Beatyard are delighted to bring SG Lewis to Dun Laoghaire, Dublin this August.

With influences including Bon Iver and James Blake, he’s at the forefront of a new wave of musical multi-hyphenates known for both a killer live show with a band and singing as well as a highly technical approach to making brilliant dance music. His is equal parts ethereal and upbeat, catchy but still clever.

 

Greg Wilson is a Merseyside-based DJ who started out during the seventies disco era and played a pivotal role in the development of UK club culture in the early eighties during his tenure at Wigan Pier and Manchester’s Legend plus The Haçienda, with his upfront selection of NYC electro-funk grooves. Focussing on production over the next decade he worked on the seminal ‘UK Electro’ in ’84, and produced two critically acclaimed albums for the Ruthless Rap Assassins in ‘90 and ’91.
Returning to DJing in 2003, Greg connected with a younger audience and began to spread his reach wider than ever. His first two ‘Credit To The Edit’ compilations did much to cement this reputation as did his 2009 BBC Radio One Essential Mix, named one of the top 10 of all time, whilst Rolling Stone Magazine listed it as one of the definitive 25 online mixes, dubbing Greg ‘one of the earth-moving dons of U.K. dance.’ His Electrofunkroots and Being A DJ blogs have become an online touchstone for dance music enthusiasts worldwide, whilst in 2015 he received the Outstanding Contribution award from DJ Mag, who invited him to write a monthly column highlighting some of dance history’s finest DJs, records, labels and clubs.
Greg has DJ’d throughout the world including globally renowned events / clubs like Glastonbury and WOMAD Festivals, Ministry Of Sound and Fabric in London, Space Ibiza, Berghain Berlin and ADE Amsterdam, to name but a few.

Longtime local hero David Kitt performs his latest live show.

David’s father and uncles formed a successful touring folk group when he was young so he grew up surrounded by music, and he himself began performing live sets while studying music technology at Trinity College, Dublin. He recorded and mixed the seven tracks of his debut release in his bedroom and this debut LP, the quietly magnetic Small Moments (Rough Trade) was followed by the expansive ambient textures and looping pop mantras of The Big Romance (Blanco y Negro, 2001); his biggest selling record.

During this period he extensively toured the UK and mainland Europe, gracing the stage with record collection heroes such as Television, Yo La Tengo, Arab Strap and Tindersticks, and was invited by David Bowie to perform at the Bowie curated Meltdown Festival at Royal Festival Hall in 2002.

Then came Square One (WEA) in 2003; the soundtrack to falling in love, and The Black & Red Notebook (Rough Trade, 2005) which was, quite simply, a covers album. A snapshot tribute to a record collection, with fascinating gimmick-free Kitt-style workovers of Sonic Youth, Thin Lizzy, JJ Cale et al. 2006’s return to original material, Not Fade Away (Rough Trade) captured an artist dealing with the post-relationship whirlwind of excess and contemplation.

His most recent album is The Nightsaver, his sixth LP. The result of two years of late-night experimentation caught in the reverie of writing and recording in a home studio at the top of a winding staircase somewhere along Dublin’s Grand Canal. Without any of the baggage of collaboration or record company influence he allowed his natural influences to filter through this collection of what are concise, modern pop-songs. The free-flowing nuances of disco, Kraftwerk, 90’s house music, hip-hop of all eras and the evolving legacy of crafted synth-pop from Hall & Oates to Junior Boys can be heard throughout.

Erica-Cody is an alt-RnB singer, songwriter, and producer. Introduced by her parents, Erica’s love for music began from an early age and her talents were immediately obvious and undeniable.

Erica inspires confidence and creativity for someone so young to the industry. Its effects can be seen by the people that support and encourage her, and she hopes for the future that she can be a role model for young women in a time where there is so much pressure to be “Perfect”. 

Her latest EP Leoness is making big waves on the scene.

 

From a studio near the sea, New Jackson makes nocturnal house jams with a ghostly disco tint.